Discussions from Technology and Sport Community

I strongly feel that from a reputational perspective the risks outweigh the rewards during mega-events. Like it or not though, as sports sponsorship becomes more and more digital, it can be a nightmare to balance the contractual obligations of the individual athletes with the team policy. It will be interesting to see how this develops as a trend.
Started by Oliver Barr.
Steve, you hit the nail on the head. There was absolutely no need to show the first graphic. It was a ball on the post! So what was the point of showing it? What mattered was whether or not the ball had crossed the line after Valladares had touched it, and it did. When something is new, it always takes some time to get used to it, and it is applicable to the GLT. However, had the approach been simple, ie show only the graphic after the GK had touched the ball, the process would not have created confusion. That beeing said, from the start of the competition, we saw GLT graphics showing that the ball crossed the line when it actually hit the back of the net and when it was a crystal clear goal. Using the GLT for an super obvious goal dilutes the whole point of the GLT. I don't understand why Jonathan Pearce questioned the decision. On top of that, it went very fast! the ref got a signal in his headphone that the ball had crossed the line and it took 2 seconds to allow the goal.
Started by Steve Moorhouse.
Liverpool FC is a leader in localizing content and making connections in growing markets. This policy of publishing tailored content in native languages has been successful for established media owners such as Disney; Turner and Viacom. It helps greatly in offering local and regional advertisers a targeted platform to reach engaged and passionate fans. Many of the leading clubs and teams are embracing the opportunity to build their content offering and to reach out to their global audiences through digital. At Omnigon, we thrive on creating the best experiences and platforms to enable rightsholders to continually foster conversations and relationships with fans and ultimately deliver great value.
Started by Steve Moorhouse.
It has to be a good thing. As there are more and more ways to consume sport away from stadia, enhancing the experience for those actually attending is a bonus, and a way of increasing the value of the cost of the ticket.
Started by Steve Moorhouse.
Simon - as a Palace (and Newcastle) fan, I am not surprised that they have a lot of engagement on their social media channels. Their Instagram account is particularly impressive and gives fans another way of enjoying the build up to a match or to stay engaged throughout the week. I'm not sure many of the teams outside the big guns are using Instagram as effectively as Palace. Thanks for sharing the report
Started by Steve Moorhouse.
The stadiums that I go to through the Premier League and Football League need to improve their wireless connections massively. On the last day of the Championship last year, at Selhurst Park, Crystal Palace could secure top 6 and Peterborough needed to win to guarantee their Championship survival. We could not log onto Twitter or other sports apps to find other scores around the country and that shouldn't be the case. Here's hoping things continue to improve in the future
Started by Richard Williams.
Of course they have also just launched an official Twitter page in Japanese (@ManUtd_jp) as they arrived in Yokohama on Tour. Interesting times ahead for the Club!
Started by Steve Moorhouse.
Steve, I think it's natural to be sceptical about these changes happening with the next 8 years. Although the way we watch sports on television is constantly changing, these developments seem a bit too radical to be realistic. Also, I'm not entirely clear on how a spectator would benefit from stepping "virtually on to the pitch," but I'd be interested to read further explanations. Being able to watch from an athlete's eyes is an interesting idea, but I would imagine this would be supplementary to the regular camera angles for replays etc rather than replacing them outright, because I believe the current camera techniques give the viewer the best possible view of the action.
Started by Steve Moorhouse.
I agree that having selllers wandering around could be disruptive and irritating. If clubs want people to spend more, they really ought to focus on ensuring that kiosks in the concourses are organised and efficient and that the food and drink on offer is value for money. Also I agree that clubs could benefit from providing better pre match experience. I have noticed a large proportion of the crowds arrive at grounds in the UK late and, in my opinion, this is partly because drinks are more affordable and better quality outside of the grounds and that it is more fun to spend time in bars and pubs than in the stadia where there is (generally) hardly anything in the way of pre match atmosphere and very little to do or see.
Started by Edward Rangsi.
Ed, The old goal line technology question! The rationale behind it not being implemented has in part been that the lower leagues and non-professional aspects of the game would not be able to play under the same conditions. Which in my opinion is not an argument that stacks up at all. Surely it is better to get the greatest number of correct decisions in the greatest number of games (additionally there are number of different rules anyway e.g. 7 subs in premier league games). The important issue is that its implementation sets out clearly when and how it is to be used i.e. is it only when the ball goes out of play or does the referee stop the game and then have a drop ball if it doesnt cross the line? I do believe that there will end up being pressure over time for the teams to be able to appeal a decision (as occurred in cricket, NFL and tennis) but technology should be used to help the officials opposed to show that they have made an incorrect decision. The logical answer to me would be to have the 4th official review the incident and only where there is conclusive evidence to overturn the referee's decision should the on the field decision be overturned. Oddly Blatter appears to have made a number of comments in support of its introduction for the benefit of the game (even though personally he is not a fan) whereas Platini appears to be very hesitant to introduce it. Technology can be used to benefit the game but it is important that it doesnt rule the game.
Started by Edward Rangsi.
Eamonn, That is exactly the point. Fans are everywhere, not only at homeland! Very few sports arenas are equipped with the necessary infrastructure to increase pre and post match frenetic, very few of them have decent wi-fi coverage on their grounds, which can cause a lot of fan frustration during matchdays. The clubs, venue owners and federations still haven't notice the real time aspect of the modern fan; they want to have access everywhere, in real time, anywhere in the world. Therefore an opt-in database (with international capabilities will be vital to extend the content reach), alongside a solid web database will be fundamental to make digital tools work together. Best regards. Renato Geribello
Started by Eamonn Watson.
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